Tag Archives: feature

How to use the same tripod for video and stills

The Problem

I shoot both stills and video which often requires me too carry both a fluid head and a ballhead in the field.  Not wanting to carry two tripods, I very quickly realized that it took far too much time and frustration to swap the fluid head for the ballhead under any sort of time pressure (as is often the case in the field) and guessed there had to be a better way.

The Solution

I have always been a fan of Really Right Stuff’s products.  They are the photographic gear equivalent of a high-end german car – engineered to perfection.  As soon as I realized my problem swapping tripod heads in the field, I began combing their product lineup for some ideas.  What I found is a solution so elegant, I wanted to share it.   Continue reading How to use the same tripod for video and stills

The Ultimate Bag for Adventure Photography?

Overview

Just under a year ago, I received a call from my friend Dewitt Jones telling me I needed to check out this cool new camera bag he was using.  “It was made for you!” he exclaimed.   The bag Dewitt was referring to was the new MindShift rotation 180 Professional and anything that Dewitt takes the trouble to give me a call about, I take seriously.

I have been kicking the tires on my new rotation 180 pro for the last week and am thoroughly impressed.  I would venture to say it is the greatest leap forward in camera bag technology since the Domke F2.

Here is why…
Continue reading The Ultimate Bag for Adventure Photography?

What I Learned from Five Years in Mini Storage

In 2002 I was a freshly minted graduate from Brooks Institute, and had just received the opportunity of a lifetime – a one year contract to move to India and teach at a newly opened photo college.  To facilitate a quick departure from the USA,  I took all my possessions and in a feat of amazing, Herculean and smart packing crammed everything into a 6’×10′ storage unit in Santa Barbara, California. In my mind, I envisioned living and teaching in India for a year, then returning to southern California with tales of adventure and glory and picking up where my life left off.   

This is not what happened.

Continue reading What I Learned from Five Years in Mini Storage

Hands-on review of Peak Design’s new Slide camera strap

Note: As a follower of The Nomadic Photographer, you are eligible for a 10% discount on all Peak Design Products.  Use the coupon code “kingston” at checkout or simply follow this link to have it automatically entered for you.

I am a huge fan of Peak Design’s CapturePro camera clip.   After my first trip using it to carry my Nikon D4 in various Alaskan conditions, I knew I could never go back to a using standard camera strap during extended assignments.  The CapturePro saved both my neck and my wrist while carrying my heavy rig for days on end.  One of the things I appreciated most about the system was the ingenious Leash safety strap that rapidly adjusted to any length and doubled as a bracing /stabilizing strap when running and gunning video on the fly.  The width of the leash strap never bothered me because it never carried the full weight of my camera for any extended period of time thanks to the CapturePro system.

Fortunately or unfortunately – not all my assignments are extended affairs.  For short shoots and grab shots where I didn’t bother putting on the CapturePro camera clip – I found that the leash strap was somewhat lacking in the comfort department.  Shortly after this realization, I contacted Peak Design to beg them to design a wider strap that used their pioneering Anchor system.  As if I had rubbed the proverbial genie bottle, the next day a note appeared in my inbox from Peak Design letting me know that a wider strap – called Slide – was already under development and that they would send one my way when it was finished.

Slide arrived on my doorstep the other day and I have been kicking its tires since. In a nutshell Peak Design has broken new ground with Slide. In my opinion it is the best camera strap on the market for the following reasons: Continue reading Hands-on review of Peak Design’s new Slide camera strap

Kingston’s photography featured on NatGeo.com Climate Change Story

Panoramic view of the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hilo, Hawaii. (Jonathan Kingston)
Panoramic view of the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hilo, Hawaii. (Jonathan Kingston)

Two and a half years ago I photographed a climate change story for The New York Times at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii.  While on assignment, one of the NOAA scientists was kind enough to give me the tube (pictured below), with a admonition that I should hang on to it – as it is a historical sample of the CO2 levels below 400ppm – probably the last years it will be under this benchmark in our lifetimes. His prediction came to pass this May as the concentration of CO2 in the earths atmosphere passed the 400ppm mark.

2010 air sample showing 390 ppm atmospheric CO2 from the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.
2010 air sample showing 390 ppm atmospheric CO2 from the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

Robert Kunzig, a senior editor for National Geographic magazine, wrote a brilliant piece explaining some of the history behind the Keeling curve and putting the 400 ppm CO2 threshold in historical context.  It is well worth the read.