Tag Archives: Assignment Photographer

Jonathan Kingston is available for editorial and commercial assignments worldwide.

Thirty Days in Sixty Seconds – A Photographers Journey in Panama

I was inspired by David Guttenfelder’s “Ninety Days in Ninety Seconds”. If you have ever wondered what it is like to be a photographer working on a story like this Spanish shipwreck in Panama, here is thirty days in sixty seconds.  You can read the full story on National Geographic here.

 

Packing for my next assignment

The dance begins again.  Packing, unpacking, weighing my bags and double checking my equipment list. I am heading north to Alaska with National Geographic/Lindblad Expeditions for the next three weeks.  Most important item besides my cameras?  My Xtratuf Boots.  Follow my adventure on Instagram @JonathanKingston

Kingston’s photography featured on NatGeo.com Climate Change Story

Panoramic view of the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hilo, Hawaii. (Jonathan Kingston)
Panoramic view of the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hilo, Hawaii. (Jonathan Kingston)

Two and a half years ago I photographed a climate change story for The New York Times at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii.  While on assignment, one of the NOAA scientists was kind enough to give me the tube (pictured below), with a admonition that I should hang on to it – as it is a historical sample of the CO2 levels below 400ppm – probably the last years it will be under this benchmark in our lifetimes. His prediction came to pass this May as the concentration of CO2 in the earths atmosphere passed the 400ppm mark.

2010 air sample showing 390 ppm atmospheric CO2 from the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.
2010 air sample showing 390 ppm atmospheric CO2 from the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii.

Robert Kunzig, a senior editor for National Geographic magazine, wrote a brilliant piece explaining some of the history behind the Keeling curve and putting the 400 ppm CO2 threshold in historical context.  It is well worth the read.

Jonathan Kingston photo featured in National Geographic online

It was a beautiful spring day hiking with my bride-to-be  (although I didn’t know that at the time), on Eagle Creek trail outside of Portland, Oregon.  Moments after I snapped this frame a giant dead tree careened over the falls and almost took out my future wife!  Fortunately the fates had a different plan for the image and it has made it’s way into National Geographic online HERE.

A woman looks in wonder at the beautiful Tunnel Falls on Eagle Creek trail in the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, USA.
A woman looks in wonder at the beautiful Tunnel Falls on Eagle Creek trail in the Columbia River Gorge, Oregon, USA.

Jonathan Kingston’s photography featured in The New York Times

A time exposure at Mauna Loa Observatory, lasting a little over an hour, produced star trails as Earth rotated.
A time exposure at Mauna Loa Observatory, lasting a little over an hour, produced star trails as Earth rotated.
December 22, 2010 - Front page of the New York Times - Jonathan Kingston
December 22, 2010 - Front page of the New York Times - Jonathan Kingston

Thanks to a recommendation from a friend, in early December I found myself on the side of a volcano at 11,141 feet on the Big Island of Hawaii photographing a story for the New York Times.  The story revolves around the research facility and dedicated staff that has been taking continuous measurements of CO2 in the air since the late 1950’s.  Its a great read and an honor to be featured on the front page of the NYT.   You can read it online here listen to the audio slideshow here and see the slideshow here.  Enjoy!

Kingston Images shot featured in National Geographic online

A Kingston Images shot of rock climbing at Trout Creek, Oregon was recently featured in National Geographic’s online gallery.  For any rock climbers out there planning travel to Oregon, Trout Creek is a must.  A long approach hike with a short burly uphill section at the final leg rewards you with stellar splitter cracks in perfect columnar basalt/volcanic tuff rock.  At the base of the cliff, many of the columns have fallen over – creating the feeling of walking over fallen greek columns at the acropolis in Athens.  Bring tape – the cracks are much sharper than they look!  A lesson this nomad learned the hard way…

Jonathan Kingston Image in National Geographic

Cross posted from the Aurora News blog here.

August 17th, 2009

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Aurora photographer Jonathan Kingston’s image of a pair of boots recovered from a German battlefield was published recently in the June 2009 edition of National Geographic. The boots (whose original owner is currently unknown) are being used by the Joint POW-MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) to try and identify the fallen soldier so that his remains can be returned to his family. JPAC, established in 2003, is a response to the Pentagon’s recent efforts to try and find the 84,711 US military men and women still missing after various US engagements all over the world. It is home to the world’s largest forensic anthropology lab.

When asked about the shoot, Kingston said, “Assignments such as this one epitomize what assignment photography entails — problem solving, people skills, and performing well under pressure. I feel honored to have played a small part of bringing the story of what JPAC does to the world.”

To see more work by Jonathan Kingston, visit Aurora Photos.