Category Archives: Underwater

Stories and photographs from the underwater world of this blue planet.

Thirty Days in Sixty Seconds – A Photographers Journey in Panama

I was inspired by David Guttenfelder’s “Ninety Days in Ninety Seconds”. If you have ever wondered what it is like to be a photographer working on a story like this Spanish shipwreck in Panama, here is thirty days in sixty seconds.  You can read the full story on National Geographic here.

 

Kingston’s work featured on Nat Geo News

A few moons ago I found myself working on a fascinating project in Panama documenting Fritz Hanselmann and his team of underwater archaeologists excavating a 17th century shipwreck.  We were looking for ships belonging to the legendary English pirate Captain Henry Morgan.  Morgan was on his way to sack Panama City when a storm sank five of his ships at the mouth of the Chagres River – these were the ships we were searching for – but Panama had other plans for the team.   Instead of finding Morgan’s ships, we discovered a merchant ship laden with swords, bolts of cloth and other goods.

I was on the project for nearly 30 days – and out of the 30 days – had exactly two where the water was clear enough to shoot.  The shipwreck was located very close to the mouth of the Chagres river, and every time it rained, the visibility underwater went to just about zero.  Photographically, the project was a great exercise in patience and persistence – gearing up day after day, to be greeted with water that I couldn’t see the end of my arm in.

The great team of researchers made the days fly by, and in the end the currents worked out in my favor for just enough time to capture what needed to be captured.

Read the full story on National Geographic News – Rare Spanish Shipwreck From 17th Century Uncovered Off Panama – Photos by Jonathan Kingston.

 

We will conserve only what we love…

In the end we will conserve only what we love.  We love only what we understand. We will understand only what we are taught.

– Baba Dioum, 1968

 

Two sea lions, Zalophus californianus, at play near Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California.
Two sea lions, Zalophus californianus, at play near Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California.

What is the most important life lesson I have learned from my photography?

White-Spotted Rose Anemone, Channel Islands National Park, California.

See The Light, a workshop I am teaching with Dewitt Jones on Molokai has begun, and Dewitt started the week off with a question: What is the most important life lesson you have learned from your photography?  I can think of hundreds of life lessons I have learned from my photography, but one of the lessons that floats to the top of the edit is something I learned doing underwater photography thanks to a great mentor of mine, Ralph Clevenger.  As I was just learning the technical side of making photographs underwater, Ralph told me one of his secrets to its artistic side.  He said, and I am going to paraphrase here, ‘You have limited resources when you are underwater because eventually your air’s going to run out.  So don’t spend your time wasting air and energy swimming around.  Find a pretty spot and stay there.  Look around.  There is a sub-sea city full of wonder all around you. ’  I thought a lot about what Ralph said and later, during my travels, began to apply the same technique of finding a pretty spot and waiting.  I never though of this in a metaphorical sense until many years later when Dewitt was talking with me about finding the place of maximum potential, and then, no pun intended, it clicked.  In photography I knowingly or unknowingly, have always tried to put myself in the place of maximum potential for the shot.  Then I would wait, watch and decisively act when the time was right.  As Dewitt was speaking many years ago, I realized the same statute applies in my life.  Ever since that day, in life and photography, I often find myself asking the question – what is the place of maximum potential, and can I be patient enough to wait for the right moment to act?

I would love to hear your thoughts on the most important life lessons photography has taught you…

THE SHARK THAT WAS…

Sea Lion rising in kelp, Channel Islands National Park, California.‘All right Jacque – lets see who stays down the longest!’, Enzo smiled at me. We had been playing the same game for the last four weeks, Beau and I were on the final dive of a five-day trip and we had built up a friendly rivalry pretending to be Jacque Mayol and Enzo Maiorca, the free divers made famous in the movie “The Big Blue”. We were about to dive a site known as Silverbanks that sits on the southeast side of Santa Cruz Island. Silverbanks is a massive kelp forest in 30 to 60 feet of pure pacific blue. Swimming through the tall trunks of the aquatic trees, it is easy to momentarily forget the water and imagine how bird must feel in flight.

It is unusual for me to feel uneasy in the water, but during the dive I was unsettled — the submerged hairs prickling on the back of my neck. Determined not to let Enzo beat my bottom time, I found an uninspiring reef to photograph and slowly burned through my roll of film, taking small sips of air to conserve my tank and wondering if my friend had finished his dive.The commotion started as soon as I surfaced. “GET ON THE BOAT NOW!” my frantic friends faces yelled at me as I lazily swam towards the swim step “SHARK!”.Bat Ray in kelp, Channel Islands National Park, California.

Apparently as I was taking my time underwater, a 14 foot juvenile Great white had hit a harbor seal a couple of hundred feet from the anchor line of the boat. When I surfaced the shark was slowly circling his prey waiting for it to bleed to death.

Sharks are smart hunters. Rather than risking bodily injury to themselves, they hit their prey with the teeth that tear and wait just below the surface for their lunch to become to weak to resist. Never have I seen a more hopeless look on the face of any creature, then in the eyes of that harbor seal. It was a broken being. Waiting for death.

Juvenile great white shark, Channel Islands National park, California.
Juvenile great white shark, Channel Islands National park, California.

We waited with it. We waited for over an hour, watching and waiting for the deed to be done.Waiting for the shark to fulfill its role at the top of the aquatic food chain and take its dinner to the depths. But time was running short, and the sun was sinking low, and the channel had to be crossed. Jacque and Enzo knew the most important lesson of the sea, that she either wants you, or she doesn’t. In the final scene of La Grand Bleu, the audience is left guessing to Jacques fate as he swims into the depths and the embrace of the ocean. I also was left guessing to the fate of that harbor seal. The last I saw it; it was swimming for some rocks near the shore. A sad trail of blood lingering behind its path in the water. In my mind, it survived, gnarled teeth marks a proud battle wound on side. But in reality there was no guess that day, the sea didn’t want me and it was time to go home.

Images and Text © Jonathan Kingston 2002 and 2007 respectively

THE SHARK THAT WASN’T

Sea lions at play, Santa Barbara Island, California.The ride out to Santa Barbara Island had been rough on the Truth. Our intrepid 40-foot craft labored over the uneven terrain that the pacific presented. Some passengers had the expected rounds of sick, but fortunately for me the Marezine was working like a charm. After an all night ride set to the sound of the hull slapping the base of each wave, it was a welcome prospect to dive into the cold water of the Pacific.

The underwater terrain of Santa Barbara Island is not unlike an underwater rock castle bordered by a sandy plain with sea lion sentinels patrolling its rocky ramparts. On more than one dive I would see the aquatic animals move in pairs move along the outer rock wall of the flourishing pinniped rookery like sentinels in search of sharks. For those who have never been underwater with a sea lion, imagine an aquatic puppy that is hyper, curious, gregarious, inquisitive and graceful. Dive-bombing the unexpected diver, the daring creatures bark, twist, pirouette, dart, blow bubbles and disappear. Just like a puppy the Zalophus californianus will play until it is to tired, bored or warned of unseen danger by some form of communication unknown to man, to continue.

Ralph Clevenger and I were on the northeast side of the island when the sea lions reached this state of exhaustion after gregariously greeting their visitors for over an hour. They languished on the surface soaking up the sunshine long enough for both of us to burn through a roll of film. As we were preparing to head back to the dry deck of the boat, the calm mood among the sea lions changed and after a few nervous glances over 20 creatures had vanished from view. Ralph and I cautiously looked around for the sign of the disturbance and the dry deck of the boat suddenly seeming extremely inviting. As we nervously searched for the disturbance, unseen to Ralph, one of the smaller sea lions swam out of hiding and mischievously crept up directly below his fins. Before I could wave or point, the miscreant had latched on and begun shaking the fin vigorously side to side like a chew toy. The bubbles coming out of my compatriot’s regulator momentarily doubled in volume until he navigated his limited field of vision to realize that his leg wasn’t about to be decapitated by a shark.

Spooked and out of film, we hugged the bottom of the ocean on the way back to the anchor line. Back on the deck of the Truth we were thankful that this ride in the underwater realm had not been as rough as the ride to the island. In a typically understated fashion Ralph chuckled and said “that was exciting”.

Images and Text © Jonathan Kingston 2002 and 2007 respectively

SWIMMING WITH SHARKS IN THE SEA OF CORTEZ

Whale Shark in the Sea of Cortez, Mexico.Aaron and I heard rumors of the whale sharks after multiple military checkpoints and a dusty three day drive down Baja California Sur’s roads to La Paz. It was here that Steinbeck chose to set his novel “The Pearl” and here that we had come to search for our own pearls, those perfect moments in the clear warm waters of the Sea of Cortez to depress our shutters. My 1985 VW bus was loaded with tanks, camera gear and little red plastic gas cans strapped to the roof that had been inspected with some incredulity by the machine gun toting fedarales in their fatigues and sunglasses.

Three days of diving with hammerhead sharks and manta rays in La Paz was unable to erase the rumor from our unconscious moments. Some divers spend their whole life to find the filter feeding Rhincodon Typus, and here he was waiting at the edge of a story from a stranger where a long dirt road touches the Sea of Cortez. And so we drove north through checkpoints and hot asphalt with the VW engine struggling against the steeper hills in search of the rumor. Soon after stopping to buy extra gas we found the unmarked road that the source had spoken of. A road that quickly deteriorated from pavement to potholes to dirt and 100 miles later a small fishing village next to a beautiful half moon bay. Continue reading SWIMMING WITH SHARKS IN THE SEA OF CORTEZ